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MovNat
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Author:  jfellrath [ Mon Oct 19, 2015 7:57 am ]
Post subject:  MovNat

Hey guys - Mithel suggested a thread for MovNat discussions, based on the podcast that Sandy and I did a while back.

I would be happy to answer any questions and talk about this stuff pretty much ad nauseum because I absolutely LOVE this stuff. We can even branch out into other similar or complementary programs like Animal Flow and such if you'd like.

Author:  Mithel [ Mon Oct 19, 2015 9:06 am ]
Post subject:  Re: MovNat

The podcast on MovNat was great. Of any physical fitness concept, Bond certainly employs MovNat. All the time we see him running, jumping, climbing and doing all sorts of natural movement which most modern couch potatoes would have difficulty doing.

I've always liked a variety of exercise and I see "MovNat" as an natural extension / encouragement to do even more natural "obstacle course" type physical training.

The first MovNat topic that seems to me to be worth discussing is how to minimize injuries and how to deal with them when they occur. As I mentioned in the other thread, I took a woman to a playground and while goofing around on the equipment I managed to twist my knee. Since I dance all the time which involves lots of spinning (twisting of knees) and lifting of women, I didn't think I was particularly vulnerable to such injuries.

When you tweak yourself, what do you do to recover? Avoid the injured body part completely? Or just keep using it but only gently?

How can we avoid being idiots and let our bodies condition or warm up to new activities and thus be less prone to injuries?

Author:  jfellrath [ Mon Oct 19, 2015 10:09 am ]
Post subject:  Re: MovNat

Mithel wrote:
The podcast on MovNat was great. Of any physical fitness concept, Bond certainly employs MovNat. All the time we see him running, jumping, climbing and doing all sorts of natural movement which most modern couch potatoes would have difficulty doing.

I've always liked a variety of exercise and I see "MovNat" as an natural extension / encouragement to do even more natural "obstacle course" type physical training.

The first MovNat topic that seems to me to be worth discussing is how to minimize injuries and how to deal with them when they occur. As I mentioned in the other thread, I took a woman to a playground and while goofing around on the equipment I managed to twist my knee. Since I dance all the time which involves lots of spinning (twisting of knees) and lifting of women, I didn't think I was particularly vulnerable to such injuries.

When you tweak yourself, what do you do to recover? Avoid the injured body part completely? Or just keep using it but only gently?

How can we avoid being idiots and let our bodies condition or warm up to new activities and thus be less prone to injuries?
Lots to talk about here. I'm going to change the order in which your questions appeared here, because I think it lends to the advice better:

Let's talk about avoiding injury first.

MovNat is not just a "let's go do Parkour in the woods" regimen.

MovNat is a system of regaining the abilities that 1) we had naturally as children, and 2) that our bodies expect us to use regularly. Ergo, MovNat is made up of a system of movements that help us to redevelop those abilities. So for example, let's look at jumping and landing.

We start out with jumping from the ground to another spot on the ground, and paying close attention to proper landing technique. I'm serious here - jumping three to four feet away. You're going to take off and land on two feet, making sure that you get a full knee bend on the landing. It seems absolutely ridiculous to do, doesn't it? You're an adult, you know how to freaking jump!

But... you don't. You'll land stiff legged. Or on one foot and then fall to the next foot, out of control. Or you'll land off balance. You haven't practiced simple jumping in forever because you've been behind a desk or in a factory or in a shop or whatever. Your workouts have been running (hopefully at least outside!) and other "cardio."

So you practice that for a while. Then you put a "target" on the floor and jump to that. Then... you get a two-by-four and jump to that, practicing sticking that landing and keeping that form. Then you do it off a picnic table seat. Perhaps you do it from one two-by-four to another. Then you do it from the top of the picnic table.

You see where this is going? :) You have to re-learn these movements and practice them regularly - because if you were existing in nature, even all these little basic movements would be part of your regular repertoire of daily activity, so you'd be practicing just by existing.

It needs to become more of a practice, like yoga or meditation, than a workout.

Okay, I get it - but I hurt myself. Now what?

Well, only you can know that. But my advice here would be to go back to the most basic version of the movement you want to work on and start working your way back up till you can't handle it - pain is too much (and don't push yourself with it, for crying out loud!). If you can't handle that, then rest and do something else. You hurt your knee? Then there's a jungle gym or a tree branch looking for you to practice hanging and brachiating.

Author:  Mithel [ Mon Oct 19, 2015 10:28 am ]
Post subject:  Re: MovNat

Excellent response Jamie! I think the "practice simple jumping" example is great. Most of us don't do much jumping in our day to day lives.

Is there a website with a list of other basic activities? Or would you mind posting one idea at a time here?

Off the top of my head, the other basic activity that we naturally would have done (and did as children) but don't do as "civilized" adults is to hang or swing from our arms (after a few decades away from a playground that is surprisingly hard, yet was so simple and natural as a child).

Author:  jfellrath [ Mon Oct 19, 2015 10:35 am ]
Post subject:  Re: MovNat

Mithel wrote:
Excellent response Jamie! I think the "practice simple jumping" example is great. Most of us don't do much jumping in our day to day lives.

Is there a website with a list of other basic activities? Or would you mind posting one idea at a time here?

Off the top of my head, the other basic activity that we naturally would have done (and did as children) but don't do as "civilized" adults is to hang or swing from our arms (after a few decades away from a playground that is surprisingly hard, yet was so simple and natural as a child).
Absolutely! Check out the MovNat.com website and sign up for the newsletter and you'll get the Natural Movement guide. There are also listings for the training seminars and such.

Also, if you want to do it solo for a while, check out this article from the Breaking Muscle website - there's a four week "get started" program link at the bottom.

Author:  jfellrath [ Mon Oct 19, 2015 10:38 am ]
Post subject:  Re: MovNat

Just realized that Breaking Muscle has an issue with the link to the four-week program, so here it is:

https://breakingmuscle.com/strength-con ... rre-week-1

Author:  Mithel [ Mon Oct 19, 2015 3:01 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: MovNat

Very good links Jamie, thank you.

Author:  jfellrath [ Tue Oct 20, 2015 7:13 am ]
Post subject:  Re: MovNat

Almost forgot to add the best link: Erwan Le Corre recorded videos of most of the basic movements for YouTube users: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... FPLaNQ8rib

Author:  Mithel [ Tue Oct 20, 2015 5:36 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: MovNat

Thanks again Jamie!

Author:  Pelgrim [ Sat Oct 24, 2015 3:30 am ]
Post subject:  Re: MovNat

Thanks, Jamie

This is incredibly interesting. I live in Belgium and it's not simple to find workshops here and the few that do exist seem to be very, very expensive.
So, I want to try this on my own first. Is it possible that in the 4 week program there are only 4 days ? Also : I don't seem to find the link to other weeks than week 1.

Anyhow, very interesting. Too bad that there aren't many resources for those who want to learn this on their own.

Author:  jfellrath [ Mon Oct 26, 2015 10:32 am ]
Post subject:  Re: MovNat

Pelgrim wrote:
Thanks, Jamie

This is incredibly interesting. I live in Belgium and it's not simple to find workshops here and the few that do exist seem to be very, very expensive.
So, I want to try this on my own first. Is it possible that in the 4 week program there are only 4 days ? Also : I don't seem to find the link to other weeks than week 1.

Anyhow, very interesting. Too bad that there aren't many resources for those who want to learn this on their own.
I think the idea is that you can use these workouts as you need. Yes, there are only four days - perhaps with an "every-other-day" mentality. I found that a bit odd, too, but it is what it is.

All the articles about MovNat and by Erwan Le Corre are here: https://breakingmuscle.com/coaches/erwan-le-corre

The idea of there being few resources is a toughie, to be sure. You can find lots of information all over the web, but it does come down to having a trainer/instructor on this stuff to a great extent because of the emphasis on proper form. And it's new enough (and divergent enough from the bodybuilding mindset that is still so prevalent today) that they're still working on building their cadre of instructors.

There are a couple that I did find in Belgium, though: check this page for that. https://www.movnat.com/movnat-certified-trainers/

Author:  jimmyolsen007 [ Wed Dec 30, 2015 2:14 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: MovNat

Wow, I didn't know this existed! I knew parkour did, but not this! Even as a health & fitness coach, plyometrics has always been the bane of my existence (I just blamed having flat feet lol). Perhaps this could help!

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